Number 37 – Save Me!

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Discovery was year ’1976 for me
But it goes back to ‘73

We’re gonna’ go way back, once again, to ’73 for this one. Now as I write this, I know very well, I’m gonna’ get those, now, all too familiar questions about how this one shouldn’t be here. But I have to stand my ground. It’s not the quality of the song on this one for me. It’s the depth, the relationship with the song, and I don’t mean that in a deep personal way as much as like an “old friend”. The song to me is like one of your oldest buddies in life. No, you may not go out and raise the hell that you used too, but damn if you can’t relive it just sittin’ around drinkin’ a beer, and listening to each other…

Tyler wrote this song in a Delta Blues style, mixed with just a little bit of a Motown type of soul to it. Big on the drum beat, and a very “raw” Aerosmith “High School Band” type of feel to it. This one brings you right back to “Nipmuc High School” in New Hampshire. Or maybe your own high school, or those great 1970s parties out at a barn, or old warehouse way out in the country somewhere. We all remember those bands that were good, really good, but maybe just not good enough… yet. We all knew a few guys who played in a band or two, and some of them were even lucky enough keep it going clear into their adult lives. And there was always 1 or 2 guys that you just knew were gonna “Make It”. Right, Steve Ulicny? That’s what this song is for me. It’s those guys. It’s seeing something that’s going to happen, before it actually happens.

It’s just a jam session that turned itself into a song. And you can feel that as you listen, especially to the original track off of album number 1. I know this one will get lost, or not even make it onto some people’s lists, if they even ever attempted one, and believe me, I get that. I guess for me though, just the intro, the raw funk, the clear stumbles and mistakes within the recording, are part of what I want to hear. No, not anymore, but during my initial discovery of these guys, and my Step Brothers Ronnie, and Kenny doing songs like these in their bands, it had a sense of home grown appeal to it. Songs such as this one, gave the listener… well me at least, a personalization. They weren’t the greatest when the song came out. Matter of fact, far from it! But it was the energy behind the chords, behind the drums, behind the bass line. The deep throaty vocals, almost as if they were in your garage.

For most of their early years, this song would become the song they opened their shows with, it’s also the first original Steven played Harmonica on. and boy did he blow! This is the sound that hooked me as a kid. This is the sound I would welcome like a walk in the woods, like a hike up my favorite hill as a kid. It was a sound reminiscent, but not exactly alike… kind of a “kin” to my early childhood favorites like Mungo Jerry’s “Summertime”, or CCRs “Back Door”. Yeah, I know, they’re not in the same vain, this one’s a tad darker, but done with a ray of lightheartedness to it, that just makes you wanna’ move. They had the same down home Rock n Roll, ‘Bloozy’ feel. The same kind of stuff I remembered as a kid, getting ready for summer morning rides on our horses, or goin’ fishin’ on the California Delta. Like I said, not the same, but the same feel good vibe… It’s just blues with a kick!

No meaning to this one really, I mean you can make up your own if you feel you need to, whether it be about a dude in jail, or someone on the road for far too long without his significant other, but really it’s just a song written to complete the tracks for the album. Turned out pretty damn good too! You can make something out of the suicidal references, but there really isn’t anything there, it’s just lyrical.

Some of Steven’s early lyrics here give the listener a glimpse in to what he would ultimately come to be… a lyrical genius. You can hear Joey’s roots in R&B, but with an attitude, surely directed by Steven, but none-the-less such a great unmistakable beat. The guitars giving that extreme bend, and pushing of chords in an almost, but not at all funky sound. Incredible hooks that keep bringing you back. This one’s old people, really old! It’s raw! It’s rough!

There just isn’t much more to say on it, there never really was, it’s just a feel, from the first beat. There’s no way to explain the kind of feeling…

I hope you like it…

Well there’s nothin’ I can see
That’d ever make me wanna be without her
She good… she good to me
Said there’s no way to explain
The kind of feeling that’choo get out in the rain
She good… she good to me
See this emptiness inside
It make me scream it make me crawl out of my high
She’s good… she’s good to me…”